AP English Literature: Jane Austen Online Test

Not a few of Jane Austen’s personal acquaintances might have echoed Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges, who noticed that”, she was fair and hand some, slight and elegant, but with cheeks a little too full”, while “never suspecting she was an authoress”. For this novelist whose personal obscurity was more complete than that of any other famous writer was always quick to insist either on complete anonymity or on the propriety of her limited craft, had delight in delineating just three or four families in a country village. With her self deprecatory remarks about her in ability to join “strong manly, spirited sketches full of variety and glow”. With her “little bit (two inches wide) of ivory”, Jane Austen perpetuated the belief among her friends that her art was just an accomplishment “by a lady”, if any thing “rather too light and bright and sparkling”. In this respect she resembled one of her favorite contemporaries, Mary Brunton who would rather have “glided through the world unknown” then been “suspected of literary airs to be shunned, as literary women are, by the more pretending of their own sex, and abhorred, as literary women are,  by the more pretending of the other! – my dear, I would sooner exhibit as a rope dancer”. Yet, decorous though they might at first seem,  Austen’s self effacing anonymity and her modest description of her miniaturist art also imply a criticism,  even a rejection, of the world at large. For, as Gaston Bachelard explains, the miniature “allows us to be world conscious at slight risk”. While the creators of satirically conceived diminutive landscapes seemed to see everything as small because they are themselves so grand, Austen’s analogy for her art – her “little bit (two inches wide) of ivory”- suggests a fragility that reminds us of the risk and instability outside the fictional space. Besides seeing her art metaphorically, as her critics would too, in relation to female arts severely devalued until quite recently (for painting and ivory was traditionally a “lady like” occupation), Austen attempted through self imposed novelistic limitations to define a secure place even as she seemed to admit the impossibility of actually inhabiting such a small space with any degree of comfort. And always, for Austen, it is women because they are too vulnerable in the world at large –who must acquiesce in their own confinement, no matter how stifling it may be. The passage focuses primarily on :-
Jane Austen’s place in English literature
The literary denigration of female novelists
The implications of Austen’s attitude to her work
Critical evaluation of the novels of Jane Austen
Social rejection of professional women in the 18th and 19th centuries
Not a few of Jane Austen’s personal acquaintances might have echoed Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges, who noticed that”, she was fair and hand some, slight and elegant, but with cheeks a little too full”, while “never suspecting she was an authoress”. For this novelist whose personal obscurity was more complete than that of any other famous writer was always quick to insist either on complete anonymity or on the propriety of her limited craft, had delight in delineating just three or four families in a country village. With her self deprecatory remarks about her in ability to join “strong manly, spirited sketches full of variety and glow” With her “little bit (two inches wide) of ivory”, Jane Austen perpetuated the belief among her friends that her art was just an accomplishment “by a lady”, if any thing “rather too light and bright and sparkling”. In this respect she resembled one of her favorite contemporaries, Mary Brunton who would rather have “glided through the world unknown” then been “suspected of literary airs to be shunned, as literary women are, by the more pretending of their own sex, and abhorred, as literary women are,  by the more pretending of the other! – my dear, I would sooner exhibit as a rope dancer”. Yet, decorous though they might at first seem,  Austen’s self effacing anonymity and her modest description of her miniaturist art also imply a criticism,  even a rejection, of the world at large. For, as Gaston Bachelard explains, the miniature “allows us to be world conscious at slight risk”. While the creators of satirically conceived diminutive landscapes seemed to see everything as small because they are themselves so grand, Austen’s analogy for her art – her “little bit (two inches wide) of ivory”- suggests a fragility that reminds us of the risk and instability outside the fictional space. Besides seeing her art metaphorically, as her critics would too, in relation to female arts severely devalued until quite recently (for painting and ivory was traditionally a “lady like” occupation), Austen attempted through self imposed novelistic limitations to define a secure place even as she seemed to admit the impossibility of actually inhabiting such a small space with any degree of comfort. And always, for Austen, it is women because they are too vulnerable in the world at large –who must acquiesce in their own confinement, no matter how stifling it may be. According to the passage ,Austen concentrated on a limited range of subjects because:-
She had a limited degree of experience in life
Her imagination was incapable of creating other worlds
Women in her time were discouraged from writing about significant topics
She wanted to create a special niche for her talents
She did not wish to be acknowledged as an author
Not a few of Jane Austen’s personal acquaintances might have echoed Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges, who noticed that”, she was fair and hand some, slight and elegant, but with cheeks a little too full”, while “never suspecting she was an authoress”. For this novelist whose personal obscurity was more complete than that of any other famous writer was always quick to insist either on complete anonymity or on the propriety of her limited craft, had delight in delineating just three or four families in a country village. With her self deprecatory remarks about her in ability to join “strong manly, spirited sketches full of variety and glow” With her “little bit (two inches wide) of ivory”, Jane Austen perpetuated the belief among her friends that her art was just an accomplishment “by a lady”, if any thing “rather too light and bright and sparkling”. In this respect she resembled one of her favorite contemporaries, Mary Brunton who would rather have “glided through the world unknown” then been “suspected of literary airs to be shunned, as literary women are, by the more pretending of their own sex, and abhorred, as literary women are,  by the more pretending of the other! – my dear, I would sooner exhibit as a rope dancer”. Yet, decorous though they might at first seem,  Austen’s self effacing anonymity and her modest description of her miniaturist art also imply a criticism,  even a rejection, of the world at large. For, as Gaston Bachelard explains, the miniature “allows us to be world conscious at slight risk”. While the creators of satirically conceived diminutive landscapes seemed to see everything as small because they are themselves so grand, Austen’s analogy for her art – her “little bit (two inches wide) of ivory”- suggests a fragility that reminds us of the risk and instability outside the fictional space. Besides seeing her art metaphorically, as her critics would too, in relation to female arts severely devalued until quite recently (for painting and ivory was traditionally a “lady like” occupation), Austen attempted through self imposed novelistic limitations to define a secure place even as she seemed to admit the impossibility of actually inhabiting such a small space with any degree of comfort. And always, for Austen, it is women because they are too vulnerable in the world at large –who must acquiesce in their own confinement, no matter how stifling it may be. Which of the following best expresses the relationship of the first sentence to the rest of the passage -
Specific instance followed by generalizations
Assertion followed by analysis
Objective statement followed by personal opinion
Quotation from an authority followed by conflicting views
Challenge followed by debate
Which novel of Jane Austen has been considered the best?
Emma
Northanger Abbey
Mansfield Park
Sense and Sensibility
None of the above
Which of Jane Austen’s novel begins with this sentence- “It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife”?
Pride and Prejudice
Emma
Mansfield Park
Northanger Abbey
None of the above
The most widely read of Jane Austen’s novel is:-
Sense and Sensibility
Emma
Mansfield Park
Northanger Abbey
Pride and Prejudice
For whom is it said that she did for English novel what the ‘Lake Poets’ did for poetry?
Emily Bronte
George Eliot
Ann Radcliff
Jane Austen
Mrs. Gaskell
“The passions are perfectly unknown to her. She rejects even a speaking acquaintance with that stormy sisterhood”. Who wrote these lines about Jane Austen?
Emile Bronte
George Eliot
Mrs. Gaskell
Charlotte Bronte
Thackeray
Who is not a part of the ‘Stormy Sisterhood’?
Charlotte Bronte
Emily Bronte
Anne Bronte
Jane Austen
All of the above
In which novel of Jane Austen we come across a pivotal character of Mr. Knightley?
Emma
Mansfield Park
Persuasion
Northanger Abbey
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Description:

Jane Austen (1775-1813) was the daughter of a clergyman. Educated at home, she lead an uninteresting and unexciting life amongst simple country people. Her novels deal with men and manners –domestic comedies-all much the same yet subtly and artistically different. This short test is prepared in the multiple choice format, specially designed for students taking AP test in English literature.

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SoftSkills and Spoken English Courses
EnglishteachersVinodita Sankhyan Namrata Arora
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