Reading Comprehension Passage, Test – 4 (AP English Language)

Plato—who may have understood what better what forms the mind of man than do some of our contemporaries who want their children exposed only to “real people” and everyday events –knew what intellectual experiences make for true humanity. He suggested that the future citizens of his ideal republic begin their literary education with the telling of myths, rather than with mere facts or so called rational teachings. Even Aristotle, master of pure reason, said “the friend of wisdom is also a friend of myth.” Modern thinkers who have studied myths and fairy tales from a philosophical pr psychological viewpoint arrive at the same conclusion, regardless of their original persuasion. Mircea Eliade, for one, describes these stories as “models for human behavior (that), by that very fact, give meaning and value to life.” Drawing on anthropological parallels, he and others suggest that myths and fairy tales were derived from, or give symbolic expression to, initiation rites or rites of passage __such as metaphoric death of an old, inadequate self in order to be reborn on a higher plane of existence. He feels that this is why these tales meet a strongly felt need and are careers of such deep meaning. Other investigators with a deep psychological orientation emphasize the similarities between the fantastic events in myths and fairy tales and those in adult dreams and day dreams __the fulfillment of wishes, the winning out overall competitors, the destruction of enemies__ and conclude that one attraction of this literature is its expression of that which is normally prevented from coming to awareness. These are, of course, very significant differences between fairy tales and dreams. For example, in dreams more often than not the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales much of it is openly expressed. To a considerable degree, dreams are a result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none. The fairy tale does the opposite: it projects the relief of all pressures and not only offers the way to all problems but promises that a ‘happy’ solution will be found. We cannot control what goes on in our dreams. Although our inner censorship influences what we may dream, such control occurs on an unconscious level. The fairy tale, on the other hand, is very much the result of common conscious and unconscious content having been shaped by the conscious mind, not of one particular person, but the consensus of many in regard to what they view as universal human problems, and what they accept as desirable solutions. If all these elements were not present in a fairy tale, it would not be retold by generation after generation. Only if the fairy tale met the conscious and unconscious requirement of many people was it repeatedly retold, and listened to with great interest. No dream of a person could arouse such persistent interest unless it was worked into a myth, as was the story of the pharaoh’s dream as interpreted by Joseph in the Bible. It can be inferred from the passage that the author’s interest in fairy tales centers chiefly on their:
Literary qualities
Historical background
Factual accuracy
Psychological relevance
Ethical weakness
There are, of course, very significant differences between fairy tales and dreams. For example, in dreams more often than not the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales much of it is openly expressed. To a considerable degree, dreams are a result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none. The fairy tale does the opposite: it projects the relief of all pressures and not only offers the way to all problems but promises that a ‘happy’ solution will be found According to the passage, fairy tales differ from dreams in which of the following characteristics: I The communal nature of their creation II Their convention of a happy ending III Their enduring general appeal
I only
II only
I and II only
II and III only
I , II and III
Modern thinkers who have studied myths and fairy tales from a philosophical pr psychological viewpoint arrive at the same conclusion, regardless of their original persuasion. Mircea Eliade, for one, describes these stories as “models for human behavior (that), by that very fact, give meaning and value to life.” Drawing on anthropological parallels, he and others suggest that myths and fairy tales were derived from, or give symbolic expression to, initiation rites or rites of passage __such as metaphoric death of an old, inadequate self in order to be reborn on a higher plane of existence. He feels that this is why these tales meet a strongly felt need and are careers of such deep meaning. It can be inferred from the passage that Mircea Eliade is most likely _____?
A writer of children’s literature
A student of physical anthropology
A twentieth century philosopher
An advocate of practical education
A contemporary of Plato
Plato—who may have understood what better what forms the mind of man than do some of our contemporaries who want their children exposed only to “real people” and everyday events –knew what intellectual experiences make for true humanity. He suggested that the future citizens of his ideal republic begin their literary education with the telling of myths, rather than with mere facts or so called rational teachings. Even Aristotle, master of pure reason, said “the friend of wisdom is also a friend of myth.” Modern thinkers who have studied myths and fairy tales from a philosophical pr psychological viewpoint arrive at the same conclusion, regardless of their original persuasion. Mircea Eliade, for one, describes these stories as “models for human behavior (that), by that very fact, give meaning and value to life.” Drawing on anthropological parallels, he and others suggest that myths and fairy tales were derived from, or give symbolic expression to, initiation rites or rites of passage __such as metaphoric death of an old, inadequate self in order to be reborn on a higher plane of existence. He feels that this is why these tales meet a strongly felt need and are careers of such deep meaning. Other investigators with a deep psychological orientation emphasize the similarities between the fantastic events in myths and fairy tales and those in adult dreams and day dreams __the fulfillment of wishes, the winning out overall competitors, the destruction of enemies__ and conclude that one attraction of this literature is its expression of that which is normally prevented from coming to awareness. There are, of course, very significant differences between fairy tales and dreams. For example, in dreams more often than not the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales much of it is openly expressed. To a considerable degree, dreams are a result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none. The fairy tale does the opposite: it projects the relief of all pressures and not only offers the way to all problems but promises that a ‘happy’ solution will be found. We cannot control what goes on in our dreams. Although our inner censorship influences what we may dream, such control occurs on an unconscious level. The fairy tale, on the other hand, is very much the result of common conscious and unconscious content having been shaped by the conscious mind, not of one particular person, but the consensus of many in regard to what they view as universal human problems, and what they accept as desirable solutions. If all these elements were not present in a fairy tale, it would not be retold by generation after generation. Only if the fairy tale met the conscious and unconscious requirement of many people was it repeatedly retold, and listened to with great interest. No dream of a person could arouse such persistent interest unless it was worked into a myth, as was the story of the pharaoh’s dream as interpreted by Joseph in the Bible. Which of the followings best describes the author’s attitude towards fairy tales?
Reluctant fascination
Wary skepticism
Scornful disapprobation
Indulgent tolerance
Open approval
Plato—who may have understood what better what forms the mind of man than do some of our contemporaries who want their children exposed only to “real people” and everyday events –knew what intellectual experiences make for true humanity. He suggested that the future citizens of his ideal republic begin their literary education with the telling of myths, rather than with mere facts or so called rational teachings. Even Aristotle, master of pure reason, said “the friend of wisdom is also a friend of myth.” The author quotes Plato and Aristotle primarily in order to:
In order to define the nature of Myth
Contrast their opposing points of view
Support the point that myths are valuable
Prove that myths originated in ancient times
Give an example of depth psychology.
Plato—who may have understood what better what forms the mind of man than do some of our contemporaries who want their children exposed only to “real people” and everyday events –knew what intellectual experiences make for true humanity. He suggested that the future citizens of his ideal republic begin their literary education with the telling of myths, rather than with mere facts or so called rational teachings. Even Aristotle, master of pure reason, said “the friend of wisdom is also a friend of myth.” Modern thinkers who have studied myths and fairy tales from a philosophical pr psychological viewpoint arrive at the same conclusion, regardless of their original persuasion. Mircea Eliade, for one, describes these stories as “models for human behavior (that), by that very fact, give meaning and value to life.” Drawing on anthropological parallels, he and others suggest that myths and fairy tales were derived from, or give symbolic expression to, initiation rites or rites of passage __such as metaphoric death of an old, inadequate self in order to be reborn on a higher plane of existence. He feels that this is why these tales meet a strongly felt need and are careers of such deep meaning. Other investigators with a deep psychological orientation emphasize the similarities between the fantastic events in myths and fairy tales and those in adult dreams and day dreams __the fulfillment of wishes, the winning out overall competitors, the destruction of enemies__ and conclude that one attraction of this literature is its expression of that which is normally prevented from coming to awareness. There are, of course, very significant differences between fairy tales and dreams. For example, in dreams more often than not the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales much of it is openly expressed. To a considerable degree, dreams are a result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none. The fairy tale does the opposite: it projects the relief of all pressures and not only offers the way to all problems but promises that a ‘happy’ solution will be found. We cannot control what goes on in our dreams. Although our inner censorship influences what we may dream, such control occurs on an unconscious level. The fairy tale, on the other hand, is very much the result of common conscious and unconscious content having been shaped by the conscious mind, not of one particular person, but the consensus of many in regard to what they view as universal human problems, and what they accept as desirable solutions. If all these elements were not present in a fairy tale, it would not be retold by generation after generation. Only if the fairy tale met the conscious and unconscious requirement of many people was it repeatedly retold, and listened to with great interest. No dream of a person could arouse such persistent interest unless it was worked into a myth, as was the story of the pharaoh’s dream as interpreted by Joseph in the Bible. The author mentions all the following as reasons for reading fairy tales except:
Emotional catharsis
Behavioral paradigm
Uniqueness of experience
Sublimation of regression
Symbolic satisfaction
We cannot control what goes on in our dreams. Although our inner censorship influences what we may dream, such control occurs on an unconscious level. The fairy tale, on the other hand, is very much the result of common conscious and unconscious content having been shaped by the conscious mind, not of one particular person, but the consensus of many in regard to what they view as universal human problems, and what they accept as desirable solutions. If all these elements were not present in a fairy tale, it would not be retold by generation after generation. Only if the fairy tale met the conscious and unconscious requirement of many people was it repeatedly retold, and listened to with great interest. No dream of a person could arouse such persistent interest unless it was worked into a myth, as was the story of the pharaoh’s dream as interpreted by Joseph in the Bible. Fairy tales are retold generation after generation because:
They deal with universal human problems and accepted desirable solutions.
They deal with fairies
We dream of them
They talk of folk lore.
None of the above
There are, of course, very significant differences between fairy tales and dreams. For example, in dreams more often than not the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales much of it is openly expressed. To a considerable degree, dreams are a result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none. The fairy tale does the opposite: it projects the relief of all pressures and not only offers the way to all problems but promises that a ‘happy’ solution will be found. Which of the following is not a difference between dreams and fairy tales as illustrated by the author?
In dreams often the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales it is openly expressed.
Dreams are a result of inner pressures
Dreams find solutions
Fairy tales offer ‘happy’ solutions
None of the above
Other investigators with a deep psychological orientation emphasize the similarities between the fantastic events in myths and fairy tales and those in adult dreams and day dreams __the fulfillment of wishes, the winning out overall competitors, the destruction of enemies__ and conclude that one attraction of this literature is its expression of that which is normally prevented from coming to awareness. What is the similarity given between myths and fairy tales and daydreams and adult dreams? I Fulfillment of wishes II Winning out over all competitions III The destruction of enemies
I only
II only
III only
I and II
I , II and III
Plato—who may have understood what better what forms the mind of man than do some of our contemporaries who want their children exposed only to “real people” and everyday events –knew what intellectual experiences make for true humanity. He suggested that the future citizens of his ideal republic begin their literary education with the telling of myths, rather than with mere facts or so called rational teachings. Even Aristotle, master of pure reason, said “the friend of wisdom is also a friend of myth.” Modern thinkers who have studied myths and fairy tales from a philosophical pr psychological viewpoint arrive at the same conclusion, regardless of their original persuasion. Mircea Eliade, for one, describes these stories as “models for human behavior (that), by that very fact, give meaning and value to life.” Drawing on anthropological parallels, he and others suggest that myths and fairy tales were derived from, or give symbolic expression to, initiation rites or rites of passage __such as metaphoric death of an old, inadequate self in order to be reborn on a higher plane of existence. He feels that this is why these tales meet a strongly felt need and are careers of such deep meaning. Other investigators with a deep psychological orientation emphasize the similarities between the fantastic events in myths and fairy tales and those in adult dreams and day dreams __the fulfillment of wishes, the winning out overall competitors, the destruction of enemies__ and conclude that one attraction of this literature is its expression of that which is normally prevented from coming to awareness. There are, of course, very significant differences between fairy tales and dreams. For example, in dreams more often than not the wish fulfillment is disguised, while in fairy tales much of it is openly expressed. To a considerable degree, dreams are a result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none. The fairy tale does the opposite: it projects the relief of all pressures and not only offers the way to all problems but promises that a ‘happy’ solution will be found. We cannot control what goes on in our dreams. Although our inner censorship influences what we may dream, such control occurs on an unconscious level. The fairy tale, on the other hand, is very much the result of common conscious and unconscious content having been shaped by the conscious mind, not of one particular person, but the consensus of many in regard to what they view as universal human problems, and what they accept as desirable solutions. If all these elements were not present in a fairy tale, it would not be retold by generation after generation. Only if the fairy tale met the conscious and unconscious requirement of many people was it repeatedly retold, and listened to with great interest. No dream of a person could arouse such persistent interest unless it was worked into a myth, as was the story of the pharaoh’s dream as interpreted by Joseph in the Bible. Which author in the passage describes myths and fairy tales as models for human behavior?
Plato
Aristotle
Mircea Eliade
Modern Thinkers
None of the above
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Description:

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow: This short test is prepared in the multiple choice format, specially designed for students taking AP test in English language

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Fikay

this book is boring

1211 days 27 minutes ago

Faten Guesmi

i need a text about either family or philanthropy now if you can. thanks

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I hate this

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Berliana Cahya

i need to learn and learn more huhuhu... keep spirit guys.

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SUCK A DICK NIGGERS

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Supermonkey

there is no answers here

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